National Film Board App

I was amazed when I came across the National Film Board app it has a huge library of  documentaries, animations, alternative dramas and interactive productions on the net.   also has  playlists and upcoming online releases. All resources are free for personal use and  schools and institutions can apply for a subscription.  Alternatively you can access the resources on the internet.

Film and TV teaching resources

Everyone enjoys watching movies and adding multimedia to the classroom is a great motivator.  Using movies as a teaching tool generates interest and enthusiasm and 21st century learners spend more time connected to media than ever before so why not join them!  Spreading the power of great movies has been a goal of The Heartland Truly Moving Pictures and the National Collaboration for Youth, and in collaboration with the Finding Inspiration in  Literature and Movies (F.I.L.M.) Project, they have devised free curricula based on Truly Moving Picture Award-winning films to promote  positive messages and life-affirming themes for young people and designed  to encourage reading and watching quality content, provoke thought and exploration of valuable and important themes and issues, and inspire participation in theme-based activities.   Free F.I.L.M. Curricula has resources for movies such as Flipped, How to Train Your Dragon, My Sister’s Keeper, The Chronicles of Narnia, The Bridge to Terabithia, Freedom Writers, Everyone’s Hero, Flicka, Saving Shiloh, Ramona and Beezus and more.  It also has a guide for developing resources for other movies and books: Teaching with Movies: A Guide for Educators and Parents. Great resources and ideas for identifying teachable moments in movies and sharing them with students.

Another useful and helpful site e is ‘Based on the Book’, a resource for finding books by genre, year or title that have been made into a movie.

Free movie scripts available at The Internet MovieScript Database, and Drew’s Script-O-Rama.

Thanks to Marvan Glavac, How to Make a Difference for forwarding this information to me.

In updating this post I am adding  EnhanceTV which has a plethora of teaching resources (many of them free for download after free joining) for TV and film content.  These are available via Screenrights, the not-for-profit organisation that licenses educational institutions to copy from TV. Nearly all schools, TAFEs and universities in Australia have a Screenrights licence. For more information on the licence, visit www.screenrights.org or email licensing@screenrights.org.

Metro Magazine, Australia’s media and film magazine, again, have a number of study guide resources for film.  They are linked to the Education Shop which has additional resources for sale.